Nazca

The Nazca Lines and Paracas are in the Ica region of Peru, about 161 miles south of Lima. The region is an important destination for Peruvian national tourists as well as foreigners.

The area borders the Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on earth which makes it ideal for desert adventure sports such as sandboarding and dune buggies. This dry climate is also optimal for the preservation of mummies and other ancient artifacts, making it relatively simple for archeologists to discover the secrets of the many ancient civilizations that inhabited the area.

The climate also draws people with asthma and other illnesses that respond well to the dry conditions, although it wasn’t always so dry. In 2007, scientists discovered the fossil of a 4-foot penguin that inhabited the area during ancient times.

Outside of the city of Nazca Peru there is a 12,000 acres site containing one of the world`s greatest mysteries known as the Nazca lines. Made famous by years of speculation about extraterrestrials and featured in the latest Indiana Jones adventure, theories have been generated by the hundreds of scholars and speculators since their discovery in 1927. The Nazca lines were designated a UNESCO world heritage site in 1994. Created by the Nazca culture that flourished in the region between 450 and 600 AD, the Nazca lines make up the world’s largest art canvas. They consist of complex lines seemingly pointing to star celestial constellations, indicating landing runways for UFOs, designs of animals, plants and fantasy figures. While some of the designs are visible from nearby hills, the majority of these vast drawings are only identifiable from the air from an altitude of at least 15,000 feet.

The obvious question is, how and why? The how is not that mysterious. Through simple surveying techniques believed available at the time, the ancient engineers could have plotted the designs without an aerial vantage point. Archeological studies have discovered survey stakes carbon dated to coincide with the construction of the drawings.

The unanswered question is why? Most scholars have concluded and agree that the Nazca lines have a religious significance. But whether the lines have a purpose related to astronomy or cosmology, such as Stonehenge, is still in debate.

What is not in debate is that the Nazca lines are at risk of not being around for another millennium. The lines are just scrapes (3 to 11 inches deep) in the surface of the desert floor. They have survived until now because of the rainless, windless climate in the region. A change in climate could wipe out their existence with a single rainstorm. In recent years, there has also been damage to the lines due to squatters and unauthorized construction projects.

No doubt, a Nazca lines tour, whether from the observatory tower or one of the many Nazca Lines flights available, is a unique and unforgettable experience. No trip to the southern region of Peru would be complete without experiencing this amazing work of art.The Nazca Lines and Paracas are in the Ica region of Peru, about 161 miles south of Lima. The region is an important destination for Peruvian national tourists as well as foreigners.

The area borders the Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on earth which makes it ideal for desert adventure sports such as sandboarding and dune buggies. This dry climate is also optimal for the preservation of mummies and other ancient artifacts, making it relatively simple for archeologists to discover the secrets of the many ancient civilizations that inhabited the area.

The climate also draws people with asthma and other illnesses that respond well to the dry conditions, although it wasn’t always so dry. In 2007, scientists discovered the fossil of a 4-foot penguin that inhabited the area during ancient times.

Outside of the city of Nazca Peru there is a 12,000 acres site containing one of the world`s greatest mysteries known as the Nazca lines. Made famous by years of speculation about extraterrestrials and featured in the latest Indiana Jones adventure, theories have been generated by the hundreds of scholars and speculators since their discovery in 1927. The Nazca lines were designated a UNESCO world heritage site in 1994. Created by the Nazca culture that flourished in the region between 450 and 600 AD, the Nazca lines make up the world’s largest art canvas. They consist of complex lines seemingly pointing to star celestial constellations, indicating landing runways for UFOs, designs of animals, plants and fantasy figures. While some of the designs are visible from nearby hills, the majority of these vast drawings are only identifiable from the air from an altitude of at least 15,000 feet.

The obvious question is, how and why? The how is not that mysterious. Through simple surveying techniques believed available at the time, the ancient engineers could have plotted the designs without an aerial vantage point. Archeological studies have discovered survey stakes carbon dated to coincide with the construction of the drawings.

The unanswered question is why? Most scholars have concluded and agree that the Nazca lines have a religious significance. But whether the lines have a purpose related to astronomy or cosmology, such as Stonehenge, is still in debate.

What is not in debate is that the Nazca lines are at risk of not being around for another millennium. The lines are just scrapes (3 to 11 inches deep) in the surface of the desert floor. They have survived until now because of the rainless, windless climate in the region. A change in climate could wipe out their existence with a single rainstorm. In recent years, there has also been damage to the lines due to squatters and unauthorized construction projects.

No doubt, a Nazca lines tour, whether from the observatory tower or one of the many Nazca Lines flights available, is a unique and unforgettable experience. No trip to the southern region of Peru would be complete without experiencing this amazing work of art.

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